G35 Sedan V35 2003-06 Discussion about the 1st Generation V35 G35 Sedan

Is dry shifting bad?

  #1  
Old 05-03-2019, 12:33 AM
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Is dry shifting bad?

So I知 learning how to drive manual in a G and I was told by my dad to practice shifting gears stationary to get a feel of the gears.I went through all the gears about 4 times stationary 1 time with the car off and 3 times with the car on just to get a it memorized.I had my foot on the clutch the whole time.Is it that bad? After this I feel like my car is hard to get in 5th and 6th gear stationary.
 
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Old 05-03-2019, 03:45 AM
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Not really bad for the car. Its not gonna damage anything. Just might make it harder to get it into gear like u mentioned.
 
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Old 05-03-2019, 08:58 AM
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Nope nothing wrong with that. Something you will want to do when on the road is drop into neutral and release the clutch when sitting at a red light.
 
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Old 05-05-2019, 06:54 PM
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Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
Nope nothing wrong with that. Something you will want to do when on the road is drop into neutral and release the clutch when sitting at a red light.
I知 barely starting and having a bad time with first gear so in a stop or red light I keep in 1st gear and slowly let off is that bad?
 
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:19 PM
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It takes practice, you don't want to let it off TOO slowly because it's extra wear on the clutch, but you don't want to let it out TOO quickly because you will stall the motor.

The reason for putting it in neutral and releasing the clutch when waiting at a stoplight is twofold.

1. You release pressure off the clutch throwout bearing so it's not just sitting there spinning, makes it last longer.
2. You take the pressure off your leg, depending on your level of fitness you can get fatigued from holding the clutch pedal down. I personally have never had an issue with it but I know a lot of folks do.

I strongly recommend you get out in a flat parking lot and practice no-throttle clutch releases. From a stop, don't give the car ANY GAS/THROTTLE AT ALL, just release the clutch slow enough to not stall the motor. It's a great way to know what you can and can't do with the clutch pedal.

Later when you feel more comfortable about the clutch and shifting in general and you're not having to consciously THINK about doing all that you can work on rev-matching you shifts.

Basically you shouldn't feel the car pull or push when you release the clutch on shifting, if the car accelerates then you're giving it too much throttle, if the car decelerates you're not giving it enough throttle. Mastering this technique is how you make a clutch last for 150k miles (or more if you drive like an old lady).

I'm not even going to suggest any heel-toe stuff, that's strictly track pedal work. Same with clutchless shifting, it's awesome when it works but it's also a good way to grenade your gearbox accidentally so don't bother unless you're on the track trying to win money, women, or bragging rights.

EDIT: If you're stopped facing up a hill, when it's your turn to move, let out the clutch until the point where you JUST BARELY feel it make contact on the flywheel (while you're still holding the brakes), then you just need to quickly transition to the gas pedal and give it a little blip and you can instantly start to release the clutch a bit. Taking the slack out of the shitty OEM clutch pedal like that makes hills a LOT easier to start on but a steeply geared sport car like this is always going to be more of a pain then a low geared pickup truck or commuter.
 
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:42 PM
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Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
It takes practice, you don't want to let it off TOO slowly because it's extra wear on the clutch, but you don't want to let it out TOO quickly because you will stall the motor.

The reason for putting it in neutral and releasing the clutch when waiting at a stoplight is twofold.

1. You release pressure off the clutch throwout bearing so it's not just sitting there spinning, makes it last longer.
2. You take the pressure off your leg, depending on your level of fitness you can get fatigued from holding the clutch pedal down. I personally have never had an issue with it but I know a lot of folks do.

I strongly recommend you get out in a flat parking lot and practice no-throttle clutch releases. From a stop, don't give the car ANY GAS/THROTTLE AT ALL, just release the clutch slow enough to not stall the motor. It's a great way to know what you can and can't do with the clutch pedal.

Later when you feel more comfortable about the clutch and shifting in general and you're not having to consciously THINK about doing all that you can work on rev-matching you shifts.

Basically you shouldn't feel the car pull or push when you release the clutch on shifting, if the car accelerates then you're giving it too much throttle, if the car decelerates you're not giving it enough throttle. Mastering this technique is how you make a clutch last for 150k miles (or more if you drive like an old lady).

I'm not even going to suggest any heel-toe stuff, that's strictly track pedal work. Same with clutchless shifting, it's awesome when it works but it's also a good way to grenade your gearbox accidentally so don't bother unless you're on the track trying to win money, women, or bragging rights.

EDIT: If you're stopped facing up a hill, when it's your turn to move, let out the clutch until the point where you JUST BARELY feel it make contact on the flywheel (while you're still holding the brakes), then you just need to quickly transition to the gas pedal and give it a little blip and you can instantly start to release the clutch a bit. Taking the slack out of the shitty OEM clutch pedal like that makes hills a LOT easier to start on but a steeply geared sport car like this is always going to be more of a pain then a low geared pickup truck or commuter.
thanks for the tips really helps!! Another question I値l like to ask is how do you down shift?? Let痴 say I知 in 3rd or 4th gear and the sped limit turns to 20mph how would I down shift back to 2nd?
 
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:50 PM
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Sorry I知 a noob lol I drove today on the first time on the street today and I did good but I accidentally let off the clutch too fast and ended up stalling in the street with cars honking at me but overall I think I did good.Im just having a tough time with stops and red lights
 
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Old 05-05-2019, 08:15 PM
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Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
Mastering this technique is how you make a clutch last for 150k miles (or more if you drive like an old lady).

.

That is a pejorative and sexist comment!

Been driving stick shifts for more than 50 years and had clutches last for 200k miles on a few vehicles, although I no longer have a stick shift vehicle

Telcoman
 
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Old 05-05-2019, 08:25 PM
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When downshifting that's when you want to rev-match the most, shift into 2nd gear and tap the throttle to blip the rpm's up a tad, THEN release the clutch when the rpm's are up. It should go right into gear without any effort at all and the vehicle will neither push or pull if you did it right.

Once you're engaged in gear you can release the throttle to slow down, however, THAT'S WHAT THE BRAKES ARE FOR!

There's this huge misconception due to Hollywood movies that you should slow the vehicle down by downshifting, this is wrong, clutches are an expensive and time consuming repair when compared to brake pads and rotors. Put the wear on the brakes, not the clutch. I typically don't find the next gear until right before I need it and am ready to accelerate again.

The exception to that rule is on downgrade hills, you can overheat the brakes and smoke them on long descents so you would want to downshift to keep your brakes from turning into Magic Smoke™
 
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Old 05-06-2019, 05:52 AM
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I had never heard about this mythical MS you speak of so I looked that shizz up. You people are a pretty funny bunch, I'll give you that.

Quoted from Wikipedia:

"Magic smoke (also factory smoke, blue smoke, angry pixies, or the genie) is a humorous name for the caustic smoke produced by severe electrical over-stress of electronic circuits or components, causing overheating and accompanying release of smoke. The smoke typically smells of burning plastic and other chemicals. The color of the smoke depends on which component is overheating, but it is commonly white or grey. Minor overstress eventually results in component failure, but without pyrotechnic display or release of smoke.

The name is a running in-joke that started among electrical engineers and technicians. It was more recently adopted by computer programmers. It is a widely used term with competitors in the FIRST Robotics Competition.[1] The given device operates until the smoke is released from it, at which point the device ceases to operate. Ergo, the smoke is an essential part of the device's operation, through undetermined ('magical') means.[2] The joke's humor operates via the logical consistency of what is observed, versus knowledge of what is actually occurring. This is an example of the fallacy post hoc ergo propter hoc."
 
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Old 05-06-2019, 10:30 AM
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It's true, and once you let the smoke out it's impossible to put it back in.
 
  #12  
Old 05-06-2019, 03:48 PM
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Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
It's true, and once you let the smoke out it's impossible to put it back in.
Sounds like a challenge to me!
 
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